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September 29, 2013
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Boba Fett - Lashley by JK5-Inks Boba Fett - Lashley by JK5-Inks
Just a quick piece I did up this afternoon warming up/in between pieces.

I asked Mr. Lashley if he'd be okay with prospective inkers sampling some of his stuff & he said "yeah sure."

So here's Boba!! I love Star Wars, I dig Ken's Star Wars stuff, and just had to get this out of my system!!

I'm going to do it up a bit with some logos & stuff later.

Pencils: :iconledkilla:

Inks: :iconjk5-inks:

Enjoy,

J
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:iconmattjamescomicarts:
MattJamesComicArts Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
I threw some colours down on this one (a while ago now - but I forgot to drop you a comment)

I hope you like it!

Boba Fett (Star Wars Unleashed) by MattJamesComicArts
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist
Saw it; totally awesome man!!

I really dig the smoke and flames from the jetpack!!

Interested in another Star Wars piece?  I've half-assed flatted it already...
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:iconmattjamescomicarts:
MattJamesComicArts Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks!

Definitely - I am a massive Star Wars geek :)

I have just finished putting down flats on that Spawn piece you inked too (with Caanan White) - it is a heap of fun.
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist
Cool!!  I'm sending it to your outlook email.  It'll be through We Transer, cuz it's big.

Awesome, can't wait to see it!!
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:iconmattjamescomicarts:
MattJamesComicArts Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
Awesome, I will keep an eye out for it :)
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist
Transfer complete!  Have fun with it; honestly, do whatever you think will look good!  :)
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:iconmattjamescomicarts:
MattJamesComicArts Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Professional Digital Artist
Sweet, I just got it!
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist
Awesome!  Have fun bro! ;)
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:iconkreepingspawn:
KreepingSpawn Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Solid!  ;)
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2013  Hobbyist
thanks!! Yoda
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:iconmertbaran:
mertbaran Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2013
this is just perfect man! really!
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2013  Hobbyist
Thank you!! :)
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:iconxanathin:
Xanathin Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
Solid work, brother. Good job!
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2013  Hobbyist
Thanks man! Cheers! :)
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:iconsol-caninus:
Sol-Caninus Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2013   Traditional Artist
A lot of detail and texture without a frame to hold it together. The one strong section is the forward arm.  The principle that makes this part work could be applied to the rest of it.  
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2013  Hobbyist
Totally agree: my intent with the piece was to add either a background to it eventually, with some logos etc.  Otherwise, you've got a character flying around nothing.

My objective was to be able to differentiate textures; something I've had issues with thus far.  I wanted to be able to give the armor a texture different than the clothing, different than the cape, different than the jet blast.  In looking at it, I think I accomplished THAT part...now to put it all together! ;)
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:iconsol-caninus:
Sol-Caninus Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2013   Traditional Artist
I know what you mean.  It seems that the first big step is getting volume via shading, but it tends to be generic - everything has the same texture.  Takes a long time after that before it hits home that the same shading executed with different patterning creates texture.  At that point you are creating texture and volume simultaneously.  

It's a little like learning arithmetic where you have to carry numbers from one column to another and hold them in your mind while performing another operation.  But eventually,with practice, it becomes second nature.  then the hard part is doing it well.

I'm going at it on the simplest level I can imagine.  What you're doing here is highly complex.
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2013  Hobbyist
I like the arithmetic analogy!  Very true!

I've had some people in the past point out textures to me; what I used to do was splatter to give a textured effect.  In a recent conversation with Jamie Mendoza (an inker @ Marvel & DC) he said lay off the splatter; only use it when necessary & where it works.  He actually mentions using it to direct the eye!!...which was kinda cool.  He said that you should be able to render the different textures by hand; and thus, that's what I opted to try.  I used different size pens on it with different tips for each aspect and it seems to have separated everything nicely.

Problem with me, the way I see it, is that I lack any sort of formal training for inking specifically; trouble with that is, instead of counting 1, 2, 3...etc., I'm counting 4, 7, 43, 1....I'm just trying to get my numbers in the right order.
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:iconsol-caninus:
Sol-Caninus Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2013   Traditional Artist
Like Prussian Blue, a little bit (texture) goes a long way. And you can communicate quite a bit of it via silhouette.  I think the key is in manipulating the large patterns, especially black/white reversal.

Sometime at the beginning of my quest to learn inking, I came up with the "Organic System" for learning to ink sol-caninus.deviantart.com/jou… based on five rendering patterns: Pattern I - light modeling (modeling tone), Pattern II - grading tone, Pattern III - spotting black, Pattern IV - modeling black (orthographic modeling, hard black modeling), and Pattern V - black/white reversal.  The last is really a pivot point or multiplier that turns back on the first four, changing the proportion of white to black, to generate four more effects for a total of eight (or ten if you count the two reversals).

I started seeing these patterns initially in Jerry Ordway's inks.  But once I had them down pat, I could identify them in Gil Kane, Wally Wood, and eventually in everybody.  They are the generic categories of inking (of black and white art).  Everything produced on a page is the result of their effect.  So, one can study the particulars in isolation, toiling endlessly - or, study them according to how they fit the generic patterns.  Once you lock an effect into a pattern, it is then easy to create a complementary effect by manipulating it with a different pattern (i.e. black-white reversal).  

A good example of black white reversal: superhero uniforms like Green Lantern's where part is rendered white on black (pattern I: light modeling) and part is rendered white on black (Pattern IV: hard black modeling).  Putting these patterns side by side creates a strong sense of differing textures.     
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2013  Hobbyist
I'm going to have to go back a re-read some of this stuff;  I'm getting little tidbits here & there from people and am finding that I'm forgetting more than I'm learning.  I need to put them all into one place for easy reference...you've gotta love getting older....

I need to find how each step (pattern) relates to what it is I'm putting down on paper; dissect a piece of art as I work on it while learning from the system.  I am beginning to understand textures & how to achieve them, but as I progress with that learning, I need to establish the basics as well...again I'm counting all out of order... ;)
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:iconsol-caninus:
Sol-Caninus Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2013   Traditional Artist
This is just my own intuitive formulation.  It makes sense to me, but that doesn't mean squat in the real world.  Hehe.  If it helps, that's great.  If not, chuck it; don't let it bug you.  

If you take away anything let it be an awareness of reversing ratios of black and white, how that occurs in all (complete/satisfying) compositions and that with a little analysis and tinkering it can be the key to modulating tone and texture.  
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2013  Hobbyist
I think the best way of helping me in this particular situation, black/white composition, would be to either study, or practice for myself on some older pencils that are a little looser, less rendered than what I'm working on.  I think that way, I may be able to work through the process in an A + B = C kind of way rather than the C = B + A...?
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(1 Reply)
:iconsol-caninus:
Sol-Caninus Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2013   Traditional Artist
GFI! (... go for it)
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:iconmattjamescomicarts:
MattJamesComicArts Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
This look awesome!
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:iconjk5-inks:
JK5-Inks Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2013  Hobbyist
Thanks man!!
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